Silicon Valley State of Mind, a blog by John Weathington, "The Science of Success"
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    Welcome to a Silicon Valley State of Mind, thoughts tips and advice based on the consulting work of John Weathington, "Silicon Valley's Top Information Strategist."

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Silicon Valley State of Mind

Tips, thoughts, and advice based on the consulting work of John Weathington, "The Science of Success."

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Archive, June 2013. Switch to list view

    Posted by on in Leadership

    Do happy employees create successful organizations? Well, according to Glassdoor, the happiest companies in Silicon Valley are:

    1. Facebook
    2. Google
    3. LinkedIn
    4. Apple
    5. Informatica
    6. Shutterfly
    7. NetApp

    After scanning this list, I’d say these companies are pretty successful. And although it’s debatable which came first—success or happy employees—most of the extant literature on organizational development confirms the great contribution that happy employees make to successful companies. Personally, I’ve worked with many companies over my illustrious career as a consultant, and I can attest that I’ve made far more valuable contributions to companies when I was having fun.

    Happiness works differently for various people; however, I can give you some insights when it comes to analytics: data scientists, analysts, and most IT professionals:

    Smart people like working with other smart people.

    I had lunch last week with Sridhar, a good friend of mine who currently manages a team of IT professionals at StubHub. We were previously partners in crime at Hitachi Data Systems and together we solved some of its difficult challenges. At one point during the lunch he said, “I just like solving problems with other smart people.” The comment struck a chord with me that stayed for a while.

    It was harmonious with a discussion I had earlier with Jennifer Selby Long, a brilliant management consultant who develops leaders. Jennifer and I are looking to pair up on an estimable intervention at a local telecommunications company. At one point while working through the proposal she said, “This one may be tough, but I just love working on difficult problems with other smart people.”

    Of course there are other factors that contribute to employee happiness; however, for smart people, this is an important one. Make sure to surround your smartest people with other smart people. Oh—and a huge salary doesn’t hurt either.

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